About Bill Glose

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Bill Glose Articles written 61

Bill Glose is an award-winning writer whose honors include the F. Scott Fitzgerald Short Story Award, a first-place award for sports news writing from the Virginia Press Association, and the Missouri Humanities Council Award for Veterans Poetry. He’s written four books of poetry, and since 2003 has been a contributing editor at Virginia Living and a regular contributor to Super Lawyers, among other magazines. He appears frequently as a featured speaker on literary craft and serves as a judge in writing contests.

Articles written by Bill Glose

Randy Sorrels’ $350 Million Verdict

How the Houston attorney changed the life of a catastrophically injured airport worker

Last October, in one of the largest jury awards ever handed down in Harris County, a Houston jury gave former United Airlines employee Ulysses Cruz $352.7 million for injuries he suffered on the tarmac. “It’s the largest actual-damages jury verdict for an injured worker in a contested trial in the United States’ history,” says former State Bar of Texas president Randy Sorrels, who represented 50-year-old Cruz. On Sept. 7, 2019, Cruz was working as a “wing walker” at George Bush …

Project Chimps

Bruce Wagman’s decision to found a chimpanzee sanctuary

Yes, Bruce Wagman, an animal lover who practices animal law, has heard the jokes. “Occasionally I have to say to people, ‘Yes, that’s really my name,’” he says. “Especially when I’m doing dog cases.” Wagman shares his home with three dogs and five cats, and at Riley Safer Holmes & Cancila, his entire practice focuses on animal law—he is the nation’s only lawyer at a major law firm who dedicates 100 percent of his focus to the area.  “It’s the greatest job in the …

Fighting for Air

Robert McKinstry Jr. works to tackle climate change

When it comes to sustainability, Robert McKinstry Jr. walks the walk.  In 2018, McKinstry left Ballard Spahr, where he’d practiced since 1987, to set up a solo shop with a focus on environmental law, sustainability and climate. And at home? “I have an induction stove, which is electric,” McKinstry says. “It’s very efficient. I also eliminated oil heat here and put in ground-source geothermal, which uses geothermal and a heat pump. You eliminate greenhouse gas emissions that way.” …

Choosing to Be Happy

How Steve Emmert found his niche

For Steve Emmert, two decades as a litigator was just a rehearsal for his true calling: appellate law. “A trial lawyer can only win one case at a time,” he says, “but an appellate lawyer can win a thousand cases into the future, even after he is gone, by establishing the right rule of law.” Emmert should know. It’s not just that he’s handled scores of appeals both for the city of Virginia Beach and his current firm, Sykes, Bourdon, Ahern & Levy; his website Virginia Appellate …

Solar Power to the People

Todd Chason got in on the ground floor of Maryland’s solar industry

Todd Chason always assumed he would follow in his father’s footsteps and become a litigator. But in 2003, soon after he began in Gordon Feinblatt’s litigation group, he found himself more tuned in to the challenge and intrigue he saw in the firm’s work in the ever-evolving energy and environmental space. “My mother always joked, ‘What kind of real law are you doing if you’re not in the courtroom?’” says Chason. “But I found it fun to be able to see the physical manifestation …

Boardwalk Empire

Before the law, Joey Kroart helped run his family’s iconic Ocean City art gallery

Most people pushing 40 have settled into their careers. At 39, Joey Kroart upended his. “When I got to law school,” he says, “my classmates who were 23, 24 years old said, ‘Wait a minute, you’re a full-time student, and you’re married, and you have two young kids, and you live almost three hours away? How are you doing this?’ I said, ‘When you have a family, you do what you have to do.’”  That work ethic is something he picked up at his family’s iconic art store at Second …

Coming to America

Immigrant attorneys share their journeys to, and visions of, America

Qiwei Chen and Weihong Hsing both came for a better education. Leno Thomas’ and Ruben Honik’s families were looking for more opportunity.  Each of these Pennsylvania attorneys began their journey in another country and had various hurdles to overcome along the way. But each has embraced their new home and sought out their own version of the American Dream.  Leaving Home Leno Thomas, Solomon, Berschler, Campbell & Thomas, personal injury, India, 1977: Back in the late ‘70s, America …

Soundcheck

By day, Rodney Bean guides companies through complex employment issues; by night, he helps local musicians find their groove

Long before Rodney Bean became a labor and employment lawyer, he was an enthusiastic denizen of the music scene. “My parents bought me a drum set when I was 5 years old,” he says. “It’s probably something they regretted, but it touched off a lifelong love of music.” Bean played drums in rock bands through high school and college and into law school. “The judge I clerked for thought it was really funny that I was still playing in rock bands,” Bean says, laughing. “He probably …

Chuck Zauzig and the Art of Zen Maintenance

The med-mal lawyer’s escape comes in waves

Chuck Zauzig strides into his office in Woodbridge wearing boots and a tattersall blazer over a surf-brand T-shirt with an image of Buddha on the front. His faded jeans are patched at the knee with a tiger-patterned flap of fabric cut from an old shirt. He hardly seems likely to be one of the top medical malpractice lawyers in the state—or, as Jeffrey Briet of Breit Cantor Grana  Buckner, calls him one of the best “in the country.” “Chuck is easy-going,” Breit says. “He has no ego, …

Judge Not

Marc Williams defends the West Virginia chief justice

While most of the nation watched a presidential impeachment from afar this year, Marc Williams had a front-row seat in 2018 when the West Virginia House of Delegates attempted to impeach all five state Supreme Court justices over alleged misappropriation of funds.  Williams and his legal team at Nelson Mullins in Huntington represented Chief Justice Margaret L. Workman. He felt the impeachment argument failed to consider the state’s constitutional arrangement regarding authority over …

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