About Jim Walsh

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Jim Walsh Articles written 70

Jim Walsh is an award-winning author, journalist, writer, and songwriter from Minneapolis. An alumnus of the University of Minnesota School of Journalism and Mass Communication, and a John S. Knight fellow at Stanford University, his work has appeared in Rolling Stone, The New York Times, the St. Paul Pioneer Press, and many other publications. He is the author of The Replacements: All Over But the Shouting: An Oral History; Gold Experience: Following Prince in the ’90s; and Bar Yarns and Manic-Depressive Mixtapes: Jim Walsh on Music from Minneapolis to the Outer Limits.

Articles written by Jim Walsh

What You Can and Can't Do with Marijuana in Oregon

It's legal, but there are some limitations

On July 1, 2015, the state of Oregon became the fourth—after Colorado, Washington and Alaska—to legalize marijuana for recreational use. But questions remain on how to handle a substance that’s still illegal at the federal level. Where Can You Smoke Recreational Marijuana? In your home, of course, but not in bars and restaurants, public parks, nor on the streets. Also, “There are cannabis clubs where you pay a membership and you can come and smoke,” says Richard McBreen III, a …

What's Covered If You're Injured on the Job in New York

Legal tips for when a workplace injury leads to workers’ comp

An employee injured on the job should take several immediate steps, says Catherine M. Stanton, a workers’ compensation attorney who represents employees at New York-based Pasternack Tilker Ziegler Walsh Stanton & Romano. Seek medical treatment (dependent upon severity of injury) Make sure the doctor or hospital knows it's a work-related injury Notify your employer of the injury within 30 days (by state law) File a claim with the state within two years (you can download the workers' comp …

A Golden Age

An oral history of lawyers who began practicing law more than 50 years ago, and are still at it today

The six attorneys spotlighted here took streetcars to the office, did research via law libraries instead of laptops and sometimes took home $400—a month. When they started, divorce came with fault, nuptials happened without the pre-, and carbon copies were the tried-and-true method of distributing mass information.  They were involved in some of Minnesota’s most famous trials, and together they account for a total of 355 years of practicing law. HeRe ARe theiR stoRies.   Some were …

Taxing Situations for New Yorkers

What to do if you owe Uncle Sam back taxes

From Willie Nelson to Martha Stewart, Wesley Snipes, and countless ordinary working stiffs, Americans have a long history of not paying their personal income taxes. If you fall behind, what can you do about it, and when should you seek help? “Contact an attorney and an accountant right off the bat,” says Jill Darrow of Katten Muchin Rosenman. “We tell [clients] to immediately file the back-tax returns, even if they can’t pay the taxes.” Send a letter along with the income tax returns …

Model Lawyer

How Kristi Anderson Wells’ life as a Ford model paved the way to a successful family law practice

Since its inception in 1946, Ford Models has been credited with launching the careers of actresses Kim Basinger and Lindsay Lohan, and supermodels Cheryl Tiegs and Christie Brinkley.  Now add a Super Lawyers selectee. Kristi Anderson Wells, a family law attorney at Gutterman Griffiths in Littleton, didn’t exactly “meet cute” with Ford co-founder Eileen Ford. In 1980, Ford saw the 14-year-old Seattle ballet student at a modeling audition and told her: “You will never be a model. …

The Counter-Balancing Force

Dan Gustafson doesn’t shy away from representing society’s biggest pariahs

In late 2003, 22-year-old University of North Dakota student Dru Sjodin was abducted from a Grand Forks mall parking lot. After a search that lasted five months, Sjodin’s body was found near Crookston, not far from the home of Alfonso Rodriguez Jr., a Level III sex offender who had recently been released after completing a 23-year prison term. Rodriguez was ultimately convicted in federal court of Sjodin’s abduction and stabbing death, and now sits on death row at the U.S. Penitentiary at …

Bring Me Your Poor (nah), Your Tired (please), Your Electrical Engineers (maybe)

Nancy Elkind on the dysfunction of U.S. immigration policy

“When I first started, there were only a handful of immigration lawyers [here], and people would go, ‘Really? Immigration in Denver? What do you do?’” One of the things Nancy Elkind does these days is explain something about immigration law, since the rhetoric, particularly during election cycles, can get a little heated. Take Donald Trump’s promise to deport 11 million undocumented immigrants in his first 18 months as president. “It’s frustrating, because immigration law is very …

The Man From Luck

Ardell Skow has spent 50 years taking personal injury cases in northwestern Wisconsin

Ardell “Dell” Skow was born and raised and currently lives in the town of Luck, Wis., former home to the Duncan Toys yo-yo factory, population 1,100. “When I’m not there, I like to say I’m out of Luck,” Skow says with a smile. He also says, “You are where you come from.” The childhood he describes is something out of a Norman Rockwell painting. “My dad always respected everybody in town. We’d go into town on Saturday night and I’d get a quarter as a kid, and we’d watch …

Finding the Good

Deborah Ellis defends cops and the people arrested by them

Last year in early December, Deborah Ellis jumped on the Green Line near her office in downtown St. Paul for the 40-minute trip to the Hennepin County Courthouse in downtown Minneapolis. As usual, Ellis—a respected defense attorney and a no-nonsense but acutely empathetic woman whose clients have included killers, child pornographers, sex offenders, child abusers, Hell’s Angels, and police officers accused with brutality—used her travel time to prepare for an appearance in court. As the …

Helping Those Who Help Those

Russell Kemp’s pro bono work with Habitat for Humanity

Russell Kemp’s connection to Habitat for Humanity started with one email 13 years ago. It came from the American Bar Association, asking if anyone could work pro bono for Habitat for Humanity of Metro Denver. “They had a project they needed help on, which turned out to be the first multi-family community condo that Habitat did in Colorado,” says Kemp, a real estate attorney at Ireland Stapleton Pryor & Pascoe. “So I got to work on a groundbreaking project.” You could say it was in …

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